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C0 note (16,35 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

D0 note (18.35 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

C0 note (16,35 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

F0 note (21.83 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

G0 note (24.50 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

A0 note (27.50 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

Peters, Randolph: Hallucinations 

 

 

Basic information

  • Title: 
    Hallucinations
  • Subtitle: 
    for Oliver Sacks & John Corigliano
  • Composer: 
  • Duration (in minutes): 
    12
  • Year of composition: 
    2013
  • First performance (year): 
    2013
  • First performance (venue): 
    Orpheum Theatre, Vancouver
  • First performance (performers): 
    Vancouver Symphony Orchestra
  • Conductor: 
    Obligatory
 

Notes

  • Program notes: 

    Hallucinations is inspired by the book Musicophilia – Tales of Music and the Brain by Oliver Sacks.
    In the past decade we have witnessed an explosion of new research dealing with the brain, hormones and
    neurotransmitters and how they relate to music. Oliver Sacks is one of the first to write about this new fascinating field
    of study. His narrative reports are based on actual cases where unusual brain conditions have caused strange and
    surprising ways of experiencing music.
    This is music about the way we hear music.
    "John C." from the book Musicophilia is plagued by aural hallucinations. This is not optimal for anyone, but in the case
    of esteemed composer John Corigliano, it could have been a career killer. Fortunately for all of us, John has learned to
    live and thrive with this condition. I asked him if I could “borrow” one of his melodies (“The Red Violin Caprices”) as one
    of the hallucinations in this movement and he graciously agreed. The other hallucinations are my own. They often
    appear just when I’m trying to sleep. See also Sack’s most recent book Hallucinations.
    For more information about music cognition and the brain, see books and articles by Oliver Sacks, Daniel Leviton, David
    Huron, and Isabelle Peretz among others. The NPR podcast RadioLab is another excellent source on this topic.
    –Randolph Peters

 

Instruments

Total number of musicians: 
56
Musicians1st player2nd player
Flute
3
Piccolo
C
Oboe
3
Oboe
Oboe
Clarinet
3
B-flat
B-flat
Bassoon
3
Bassoon
Bassoon
Horn (F)
4
Trumpet
3
B-flat
B-flat
Trombone
3
Tenor
Tenor
Tuba
1
MusiciansInstruments
Harp
1
 
Musicians1st player2nd player
Violin
16
Viola
6
Cello
6
Double Bass
4
4-string
4-string

 

 

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