ISCM

C0 note (16,35 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

D0 note (18.35 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

C0 note (16,35 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

F0 note (21.83 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

G0 note (24.50 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

A0 note (27.50 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

Dahn, Luke: Giuoco Piano 

 

 

Basic information

  • Title: 
    Giuoco Piano
  • Subtitle: 
  • Composer: 
  • Duration (in minutes): 
    9
  • Year of composition: 
    2018
  • First performance (year): 
    2019
  • First performance (venue): 
  • First performance (performers): 
    Viktor Valkov
  • Genre: 
  • Keywords: 
 

Notes

  • Program notes: 

    Giuoco Piano is a set of five short piano pieces each of which is based on a famous historical chess game. The first movement, based on the game known as "Kasparov’s Immortal,” features two main musical ideas. In the opening, accents and ornaments in the piano’s high register gradually descend and give way to sonorous oscillations. The aggressive and musically extroverted second movement with its sharp low register chords and passagework was inspired by a fascinating chess game involving Indian grandmaster Vishy Anand and Bulgarian grandmaster Veselin Topalov, a game that another notable grandmaster said constituted “23rd century chess.” By contrast, movement three is an extremely placid, angular two-voice canon in which the second voice appears in contrary motion and rhythmic diminution. Occasional accents denote the captures of a 2006 chess game between Topalov and Armenian GM Levon Aronian. The fourth movement is a kind of modernist allemande being restricted to less than four octaves of the piano, as if written for clavichord. Its stylistic allusions to early music reflect the chess game on which it is based: the earliest recorded chess match from 1475 between Castellvi and Vinyoles. The fifth and final movement, based on the 1929 game known as the “Polish Immortal” in which chess legend Miguel Najdorf sacrifices both his bishops and both his knights on the way to victory, provides an ominous, thundering conclusion to the set. The title of the work is taken from one of the oldest of chess openings, and the “Giuoco Piano” is still a frequently-used opening today. Giuoco Piano was written for pianist Viktor Valkov.

 

Instruments

Total number of musicians: 
16
Musicians1st player2nd player
Flute
1
Oboe
2
Clarinet
2
Saxophone
2
Bassoon
2
Trumpet
2
Trombone
2
MusiciansInstruments
Keyboard
1
Piano
Musicians1st player2nd player
Double Bass
2

 

 

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